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Clark Aldrich

Today's education system is biased towards those who are good at analyzing and away from those who are good at doing. 
We must fix it.

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Why can't schools teach leadership?
Or innovation? 

T​he mission of education is to connect each person's individual talents to their individual passions to enable growth.   That's it.  Everything else gets in the way.

If someone's great at chemistry and believes the greatest injustice in the world is hunger, the goal of education is to help that person find a career or launch a start-up connecting that talent and mission.

This common sense idea requires radical new thinking, and a rejection of many of our past approaches to education.  Aldrich's fifth book Unschooling Rules outlines just how big that shift needs to be.  We need to incubate as many new philosophies and models of education as possible. 

One under-appreciated part of rethinking education is rethinking educational media.  Educational media is to education what pharmaceuticals are to medicine.  And today's workbooks, tests, recorded lectures, and textbooks may just be snake oil, biasing schools towards teaching how to judge and away from how to do anything new.  

To address this, Clark Aldrich and his wife Muffy Aldrich work with innovative education-delivering entities both at a strategic level and also in testing new approaches to educational media itself.  

Working across military, corporate, investing, and academic clients, and often at odds with today's Ed.D. culture, Clark Aldrich has recently made a series of breakthroughs in educational media that allow schools to finally teach such sought after skills as leadership and innovation. 

His new approach, Short Sims, is a revolutionary alternative, yet still compatible with today's institutional schools.  They also make education more fair. His sixth book and first book on the topic, Short Sims, is a technical manual to help instructional designers build their own.   

He and his work have appeared widely including in New York Times, CNN, and CBS.  

Aldrich, who received his degree in Cognitive Science from Brown University and held a top secret clearance level, balances hands-on, practical work with strategic engagements.

Books and Patent by Clark Aldrich

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Cover Art of Simulations and the Future
Clark Aldrich's Learning By Doing Cover.
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The Guide Cover.jpg
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